Public Sculpture by Conceptual Artist Dennis Oppenheim

Philadelphia has a new sound. Home to the Declaration of Independence and the famous Liberty Bell, the city now hosts an installation of bell-like public sculpture by conceptual artist Dennis Oppenheim. Wave Forms is spectacular, featuring six, 20 foot, bell shapes made of aluminum tube and perforated aluminum, in open-air courtyards adjacent to a new apartment complex at the University of Pennsylvania.

Oppenheim refined his proposal in consultation with the landscape architect Sara Peschel. The work was engineered, transported and installed by La Paloma Fine Art of Sun Valley, California. – The First Art Newspaper on the Net.

American Institute of Architects – Illinois great places

 The members of six Illinois chapters of the American Institute of Architects selected the sites, which are all public spaces, to celebrate the AIA’s 150th anniversary, notes the Web site

University architecture and landscaping recognized by American Institute of Architects.

Green roofs taking root

Shaw, a Eugene home­owner interested in environmentally sustainable building techniques, installed the green roof on an addition two years ago.

It’s one of a handful of public and private Eugene buildings that sport a layer of greenery on top, a trend that has taken off in larger metropolitan areas such as Portland and Chicago.

A technique dating back thousands of years, it was resuscitated in Germany more than 20 years ago, and is gaining ground in the United States.

Green roofs taking root: The Register-Guard, Eugene, Ore..

Waterfront plan: A magnet and, hopefully, model

Relax, Toronto, all is not lost; the wheels of change grind no slower here than in any other city.

So says Dutch landscape architect Adriaan Geuze, whose firm, West 8, is now redesigning the central waterfront in partnership with Toronto’s DTAH.

“Bureaucratic resistance is normal,” he says, smiling reassuringly. “It’s the same everywhere.”

Geuze should know; he’s worked in cities across Europe and North America. Still, he admits he has his work cut out for him in Toronto. | News | Waterfront plan: A magnet and, hopefully, model.

People spending to much time indoors

There’s a good reason for wanting to instill the urge to explore nature early on. In the January 2008 issue of the journal Environment and Behavior, landscape architects in Scotland suggest that regular childhood visits to the woods or similarly green places influence adult attitudes toward these same areas.

The work was done by Catherine Ward Thompson from the Edinburgh College of Art together with Peter Aspinall and Alicia Montarzino from the Heriot-Watt University.

Enjoying the green –, Philippine News for Filipinos.

The Biggest Mies Collection

On the edge of downtown Detroit, just east of the Chrysler Freeway and not far from Detroit’s still-troubled neighborhoods, lies Lafayette Park, one of the nation’s most beautiful — and most obscure — residential developments. Composed of three sections — a high-rise apartment building and 21 multiple-unit townhouses on the western border, 13 acres of landscaping down the center, and twin apartment towers on the east — Lafayette Park holds the largest collection of buildings in the world designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

Called “oft-overlooked” by the Harvard Design School and “a little-known jewel of modern urbanism” by Detlef Mertins, a professor of architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, it should be renowned, both for its loveliness and for its ability to thrive through Detroit’s dark times of riots, destruction and middle-class flight.

The Biggest Mies Collection – Wall Street Journal – Julia Vitullo-Martin

IFLA Congress 2008 – Netherlands – Final Call

Final Call for papers and contributions to 2008 World Congress due on
31st DECEMBER 2007.

Submit here


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