Parkway planned for Memphis Airport

Ritchie Smith Associates have proposed turning the 2-mile stretch of barren road from Memphis International Airport (the home of Fedex) into a Parkway at a cost of $1 to $2 million dollars. The plan includes planting 2,500 trees, new lighting, signage and some public art. As apart of the masterplan a 180 scupltural lights have been proposed along the Parkway. The plan is to be reviewed by council in mid September.

SOURCE: Memphis Flyer – Seed the Plough

U Va. students to map green spaces

A group of students from the University of Virginia School of Architecture will be mapping green spaces in Strauton to decide how to manage and restore the spaces. The class dubbed Greens Lands is sponsored by the Urban and Community Forestry Program of the USDA Forest Service and the Virginia Department of Forestry. The students will use GIS as there main tool for mapping and assessment.

SOURCE: Newsleader.com – Staunton, U.Va. students team up to map city green spaces

NASA launches ‘Sustainability Base’

Yesterday, NASA’s Ames Research Center held a ground breaking ceremony for its new ‘Sustainability Base’ – a high performance Platinum LEED Rated building in Moffett Field California. The building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally built buildings of equivalent size and reduce building maintenance costs.

To help achieve the building’s sustainability objectives, the company will install approximately 72 geothermal wells featuring ground-source heat pumps, and will provide parking and landscaping with California-native plants.

The $20.6 million building  is designed by AECOM and William McDonough + Partners and Landscape Architects – Siteworks.

You can also watch a video about NASA’s Sustainability Base

SOURCE: NASA
IMAGE SOURCE: NASA

Israel to build 50,000 seat amphitheatre on garbage mountain

Designs for a 50,000 seat amphitheatre are planned for Ariel Sharon Park previously Israel’s largest garbage dump. The design for the 2,000 acre park will be completed by the end of this week. The design includes a 20-acre lake that will recycle water from the site, sculpting of the park so that it can serve as a flood plain during winter flooding, a large car parking lot, and a railway station. The designs are being drawn up by Latz + Partner, along with Israeli landscape architect firms Broida-Maoz and Moria Sekely. The design approval process will take up to 3 years. The park is planned to staged over a 20 to 40 year period.
SOURCE: Haaretz.com – Noam Dvir

Governors Island – Useless Beauty – The New Yorker

Wondering what’s happening to Governors Island after the International Design competition was won by the design group led by WEST 8. Well, the August 31, 2009 edition of the New Yorker (subscription only) on p. 56 has an article titled Useless Beauty’ by local correspondent Nick Paumgarten, who discusses plans for a park on the island designed by the Dutch architecture firm West 8. A section of the abstract(shown below) gives a hint of the discussion that takes place with Adriaan Geuze.

Writer discusses the proposed park area with Adriaan Geuze of West 8. Briefly compares the Governors Island to the development of the High Line. A risk of a project like the High Line or Governors Island is that the place may pass from one kind of elitism, in which virtually nobody is allowed, to another, in which ambitious restoration introduces esoteric or refined tasted and uses. (SOURCE:THE  NEW YORKER)

Sounds like an interesting read for those lucky enough to have a subscription or able to buy a copy.

Another incentive to buy a copy is the article by Ian Frazier Ian Frazier, Parks Dept., “Treepocalypse,” The New Yorker, August 31, 2009, p. 26 which looks at the about trees in Central Park destroyed by a recent severe thunderstorm.

The New Yorker has also posted a video – Tour of Governors Island.

In this video, Paumgarten tours the island with Leslie Koch, the president of the Governors Island Preservation and Education Corporation, who explains how this former military base is being converted into parks and other public spaces. (SOURCE: THE NEW YORKER)


SOURCE: The New Yorker

1 ... 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 ... 433
RSS FEED EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION Follow Us on Twitter Join Our LinkedIN Group Become a Fan on Facebook Circle us on google+