READING THE LANDSCAPE: On-Line Reading Group Seeking Members

READING THE LANDSCAPE is an on-line reading group dedicated to fostering engaging dialogue about the shaping of our built environment. The inaugural group will begin reading The Landscape Urbanism Reader edited by Charles Waldheim the week of February 21st. The group will include a total of 15 people. Depending on the material selected, the format for the reading group will involve reading a chapter, essay, or article each week with asynchronous on-line discussion regarding it during the following week. The format is intended to make it easier for busy professionals to participate. After each week, one person will summarize the discussion as a blog post for public discussion.

Due to the limited size of the group and the desire to ensure dynamic and multiple perspectives through the inclusion of professionals of diverse backgrounds, the organizers are requesting Letters of Interest from those who would want to participate.

READING THE LANDSCAPE is a collaboration between Damian Holmes founder of the webzine World Landscape Architecture and this website – Land Reader; Jason King, editor of Vegitecture and Landscape + Urbanism, and Brian Phelps, co-founder of sitephocus.com. All are also avid practicing professionals in landscape architecture and urban design.

For more information email me – Damian Holmes or Jason King or Brian Phelps
LETTERS OF INTEREST for READING THE LANDSCAPE is now CLOSED

New Publication: Scapegoat

A recent post by faslanyc we read about Scapegoat – a new journal on landscape, architecture, and political economy. Its available for free download.

Scapegoat is a publication that engages the political economy of architecture and landscape architecture. The figure of the scapegoat carries the burden of the city and its sins.

Part of New York’s industrial past lost

Recently the NYC Parks Department dismantled Pier D on the Hudson Riverfront near the Riverside Park. Removed by the Parks Department as it was slowly disintegrating into the River and once it had fallen into the river would be ‘causing a hazard to navigation’.  The piers were part of the industrial past that once the Hudson River and Riverfront played in New York’s history and surely could have been allowed to slowly fall into the river and be a future dive site for recreational divers.

Read more at the New York Times – Remnants of an Industrial Past, Now Gone

New Orleans Urban Farm hits red tape

The Viet Village Urban Farm is an integral part of  the rebuilding the community in New Orleans but has hit red tape. The CDC purchased land for the Urban Farm but the land has been disignated by the Army Corp to be ‘jurisdictional’ wetlands which would require the CDC to purchase over $300,000 in environmental credits. They are now looking at other options for the planned Urban Farm that requires $5-6million for Phase I and II.

Read more about the Viet Village Urban Farm at NOLA.com

Snøhetta introducing new ways of working to an American architecture

Snøhetta, a Norwegian an integrated landscape, architecture and interior firm based in Oslo and a smaller office in New York. The New York Office is featured in a Metropolis Magazine article by Belinda Lanks who looks at the egalitarian approach of Snøhetta and how it is working in the American market. Snøhetta offices are not just about open plan and different teams hot-desking, it is also creating a culture that is transparent, diverse and includes cross-discipline teams.  Lanks looks also into bonuses, pay scale and how hard it is for Snøhetta to maintain the culture as the firm grows.

Read more about Snøhetta at [Metropolis Magazine]

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