NY has new green space why can’t Toronto?


Vanessa Farquharson of the National Post(Canada) has written an article asking why can’t Toronto get new green space like New York. The article cites the Highline in New York as an amazing new green space in New York and looks at its history and although a the Highline is a new space the idea of raised green space was implemented at Promenade Plantée(4.5km raised garden in Paris).

Farquharson asks should the Gardiner be made green? rather than demolished. She then goes on to ask Matthew Blackett(editor of Spacing magazine) and Les Klein(Quadrangle Architects – WLA reported about his design for a green freeway)

…which parts of the city they would redesign as park space if budget wasn’t a concern

to read their suggestions go to the SOURCE: National Post(Canada) – New York’s getting new green space, so why can’t we? 

In the News – August 14

Parrish Art Museum Unveils Herzog & De Meuron Design For New Water Mill Building [hamptons.com]

How to plant a water-wise garden [The Standard Kenya]

Debate Over Urban Agriculture Reaches Metro Council [News Channel 5 – Nashville]

Architects offer high school plans [Boston.com]

Bike share systems for London and Boston

Both London and Boston announced this week that they will be installing a share bicycle scheme using the Bixi system that is used and made in Montreal.

The London (UK) scheme will be run by Serco for a cost of 140 million pounds over 6 years. The system will incorporate 400 docking stations across a 44 square kilometre travel zone.

On the same day the city of Boston announced that they were in negotiations with Public Bike System Co. – the makers of the Bixi system to install 290 stations and 2,500 bikes across the city by next summer.

Currently the manufacturer is working on solutions to the current issue in Montreal reported by La Presse in July that one in five bicycles have been vandalised.

SOURCE (London bike system): Reuters – Serco to run London’s new bike hire scheme

SOURCE (Boston bike system): NYTimes – Boston Gears Up for Biggest Bike-Sharing Program

IMAGE SOURCE: Flickr – amesis

Pier 11 back on table

Metro International reports

PHILADELPHIA. Redevelopment of a 1-acre pier shooting into the Delaware River has been touted as a change for the better at the mostly-ignored waterfront …….

“There is a lot of physical problems why [development has] been difficult to achieve in the past not the least is the highway,” said James Corner of design firm Field Operations, which won the contract to redesign Pier 11……

Read the full article at the SOURCE: Metro – Pier 11 development is back on city’s radar

Vital wetland restored to natural glory

JournalLive reports

A 50-YEAR healing operation for internationally-important wetlands in the North has taken a major step forward.

A £700,000 project to push forward the restoration of the 12,000-year-old Border Mires has been completed nearly two years ahead of schedule. Over 2,500 acres of the Border Mires.

Read the full article and watch the video @ the SOURCE: JournalLive – News – Environment – Vital wetland restored to natural glory

Glenn Murcutt speaks out about Newcastle University

Glenn Murcutt, the Pritzker prize-winning architect has spoken out about the new and revised architecture and landscape architecture at Newcastle University. Murcutt, particlarly points out that he is amazed at the cutting down of trees and the change in plant material used on the site. He goes on to online that the design process should have been different and consultation with the original architects and masterplanners.

SOURCE: Youtube

Team of UNM Students Win in Design Competition

University of New Mexico landscape architecture students Katya Yushmanova, Kristina Guist, Anthony Fettes and Elaine Stevens, as well as fine arts student Felicie Regnier, won first place in the Wayne Grace Memorial Design Competition, a contest accepting submissions pertaining to projects affecting the natural and built environment. The submissions must demonstrate a positive impact on the quality of life of the public.

The students submitted a project they completed in their Art and Ecology class for a new storm water surge pond that AMAFCA, Albuquerque Metropolitan Flood Control Authority, was in the process of developing on city’s Westside.

“In addition to preserving the character of the local topography, the students also sought to enhance the slope complexity from the original design, improve site stability, create microclimatic variation for not only visual interest but also enhanced biological function, and integrated design details that reference the engineered nature of the site,” said Alf Simon, director, landscape architecture program, UNM School of Architecture and Planning.

The competition is sponsored by the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards Foundation, and is open to any student or team of students currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate landscape architectural degree program. A jury of licensed landscape architects from across the U.S. and Canada was selected by the CLARB to evaluate the submissions.

SOURCE: UNM Today

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