Shortlisted Designs for the development of Queens Wharf

The Winners for the Queens Wharf Competition in Auckland, New Zealand has been announced after thorough evaluation and assessment, five designs have been selected from the 237 original entries.

The Finalists
Design number 024 – Andrius Gedgaudas, Architect, Shanghai China.
Design number 046 – Den Aitken, Pete Griffith and Hamish Foote, Field Landscape Architecture, Auckland.
Design number 170 – David Gibbs and Aaron Sills, Construkt / SVB, Auckland.
Design number 195 – John Coop, Tasman Studio, Auckland.
Design number 216 – Simon Williams, Williams Architects Ltd, Auckland.

The five designs were selected by chief executives of the three sponsor organisations, the Ministry of Economic Development, Auckland Regional Council and Auckland City Council with expert advice from an advisory panel comprising Prof. John Hunt, Ian Athfield, Rebecca Skidmore, Jillian de Beer and Graeme McIndoe.

The final five designs were chosen for their ability to strike the right balance between meeting the need for a great space for the public to enjoy, the ability to act as a major celebration venue during Rugby World Cup 2011 (and other future events), and the need for a world class cruise-ship terminal.

The 237 designs gave the selection team a chance to look at a very broad range of concepts from which five were chosen that have the best potential to be further developed in Stage 2. As such, they are really a starting point for the work that will take place over the next two weeks until the end of Stage 2 of the competition, on 23 October.

In Stage 2, the finalists will develop their designs further, taking into account public feedback from over 2000 forms received and the 13 specific factors (pdf) identified by the advisory panel as critical to achieving the objectives of the development.

Click to go to Competition Website
Design number 024 – Andrius Gedgaudas, Architect, Shanghai China.

Click to go to Competition Website

Design number 046 – Den Aitken, Pete Griffith and Hamish Foote, Field Landscape Architecture, Auckland.

Click to go to Competition Website
Design number 170 – David Gibbs and Aaron Sills, Construkt / SVB, Auckland.

Click to go to Competition Website
Design number 195 – John Coop, Tasman Studio, Auckland.

Click to go to Competition Website
Design number 216 – Simon Williams, Williams Architects Ltd, Auckland.

SOURCE: Queens Wharf

IMAGE SOURCE: Queens Wharf

IMAGE CREDIT: As noted at the bottom of each image

Landscape changes slated for I-90 in downtown Spokane

The Washington State Department of Transportation will make some changes on I-90 in downtown Spokane to enhance safety. On I-90 between Division Street and the Hamilton Interchange, the Department will remove trees that have grown too large over the years and replace them with a variety of shrubs.

SOURCE: WSDOT – 2009 News – Safety improvements with landscape changes slated for I-90 in downtown Spokane

Charlotte Uptown eyes 2020 vision

Charlotte Business Journal reports

On Tuesday, leaders from the uptown organization unveiled their consultants, led by California planner MIG. A mix of national and local firms will help put together the 2020 Vision Plan, with a final version expected next fall. MIG is based in Berkeley, but also has an office Raleigh. Others working on the study include local landscape architecture firm ColeJenest & Stone and ad agency Wray Ward.

SOURCE: Charlotte Business Journal: Uptown eyes 2020 vision

America’s national parks face challenges

Christian Science Monitor reports

Finding money to restore and repair the parks won’t be easy during the current fiscal crisis. But delaying will only raise the cost. “It’s just like your house. If you don’t do that routine maintenance, you’re going to have a big bill staring at you. And the bill is growing,” Mr. Repanshek says.

The maintenance challenges are huge. The NPS’s 58 national parks and 333 monuments and historic sites contain some 680 water-treatment and wastewater systems, 505 dams, 1,804 bridges and tunnels, 8,500 miles of roads, 775 campgrounds, and 12,250 miles of trails, as well as 84.6 million acres of land. “Many national parks are little cities unto themselves,” says Phil Voorhees, a senior fellow at the NPCA.

SOURCE: Christian Science Monitor – America’s national parks face challenges | csmonitor.com

Grad Student David Malda Wins National Landscape Architecture Scholarship

September 23, 2009 — The Landscape Architecture Foundation announced recently that David Malda, a graduate student in the University of Virginia School of Architecture, is the 2009-10 National Olmsted Scholar, an honor bestowed upon the student who best exemplifies leadership in sustainable design and planning.

Now in its second year, the Olmsted Scholars Program solicits one nomination from every college and university landscape architecture program in the United States, from which one National Olmsted Scholar and four finalists are selected. Last year, Karl Krause, who received his master’s in landscape architecture in May, was a finalist in the inaugural program.

Malda expects to receive dual master’s degrees in architecture and landscape architecture in 2010.

The U.Va. Landscape Architecture Program nominated Malda for his outstanding scholarship and his leadership across several platforms: within studio; between disciplines; as a co-editor of the journal, lunch; within the Graduate Architecture and Landscape Architecture student group; and through other initiatives inside and outside of the Architecture School.

Malda received the award, which includes a $25,000 prize, at the American Society of Landscape Architects’ annual meeting in Chicago last week.

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