IN BRIEF LINKS: 17 March

IN BRIEF LINKS : Interesting articles that relate to the built environment

Our rural landscape is a fiction – The Guardian

Jonathan Meades writes “Landscape is created by humans and the English have transformed theirs over the last half-century. Despite the spread of roads, industrial estates, science parks and housing estates of an architecture almost as execrable as France’s, the English landscape is increasingly infected with the artificial perfection of Georgian parkland whose purpose was to delight the eye: cows and sheep were theatrical props.” Read more….

From the Ground Up – Metropolis Magazine

Marc Kristal looks at “An award-winning planning study for Lower Manhattan may act as a model for future development…….. The 41-acre area, named Greenwich South by the Alliance for Downtown New York, the business-improvement organization that dreamed up the project, has the kind of pros and cons that can be found in any major city. Read more…..

MIT to build wind turbine on its campus – boston.com

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology will erect a wind turbine on its campus by the end of the summer after the City of Cambridge approved the project Tuesday. Read more…..

Cityscape impact fee on outdoors ads – Focus Taiwan

“The Taipei City government approved Tuesday a draft law on cityscape management that would charge large, outdoor advertising billboards an installation permit fee and an annual “cityscape impact fee” equal to 2 percent of their operating costs.” Read more…..

How to make urban alleys work – Crosscut.com

Mark Hinshaw writes “Urban alleys in Seattle may soon be making a comeback, thanks to a recent design competition that highlighted how safe, active, and delightful they could be with the right design talent, programming. and management.” Read more…..


NBBJ and Chan Krieger Sieniewicz to merge

NBBJ, a global architecture and design firm, and Chan Krieger Sieniewicz, internationally-known for urban design and architecture excellence, announced today a merger of the two firms that will create an integrated team of over 700 architects, landscape architects, urban designers, planners and interior designers.

The Chan Krieger Sieniewicz team, including its five principals, will continue in their current roles. As part of the transition to the NBBJ name, the Cambridge office will operate as Chan Krieger NBBJ.

The merger gives NBBJ, which already operates a project office in Boston, a larger presence in New England. The Seattle-based firm has offices in several U.S. cities, including Columbus, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and Seattle. Overseas offices include London, Beijing, Shanghai and Dubai.

SOURCE: NBBJ.com

Underpass Park unveiled

Before-after-Underpass-Park_West-screen-res

A derelict area beneath a series of overpasses in the West Don Lands is going to be transformed into the most extensive park to ever be built under an overpass in Canada, and the first in Toronto.

Located within the West Don Lands – home to the 2015 Pan American Games Athletes’ Village – Underpass Park will cover a total of 1.05 hectares (2.5 acres) under and around the Eastern Avenue and Richmond/Adelaide overpasses, between Cherry Street and Bayview Avenue.

Designed by renowned landscape architects Phillips Farevaag Smallenberg in association with The Planning Partnership, Underpass Park embodies design excellence and is the epitome of innovative urban park design.  The design creates a socially-engaging park for community members of all ages and abilities by incorporating public art, recreational space, playful climbing structures and play areas, flexible community space, community gardens, and public gathering places.

Before-after--Underpass-Park-Rendering-evening-screen-res

[IMAGE SOURCE: Waterfront Toronto]

UK Survey finds shortage of landscape architects

Green space skills: 2009 National employer survey findings, a survey commissioned by CABE and English Heritage, is the first to reveal the full extent of skills shortages in the green space sector in the UK. The report has found that 14.9% of national employers found landscape architects hard to recruit due to skills shortage. Landscape architects were also on top of the table as the hardest to recruit out of all the green space skills.

22% of  respondents from the Private sector stated that it was harder to find landscape architects whereas only 8.5 of respondents in the Public Sector  found it hard to find landscape architects due to a skills shortage.

Green space skills shows an urgent need to address the skills shortfall to tackle climate change. Planning, design and management are what are needed to help to adapt green spaces to a changing climate, and these were exactly the skills which employers felt their staff most lacked.

The report also identified several priorities to counter the shortage including:

– Develop and maintain a strong evidence base to make the case for investment in green space skills

– Improve the availability and quality of training, including continual professional development

– Increase awareness of the sector and the opportunities it offers, to encourage more people into the sector

Download the report at the [SOURCE:  CABE]

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Can landscape planning help get LEED certification?

stltoday.com has just published a great article about the benefits of landscape architects and landscape planning in relation to obtaining LEED certification for developments through irrigation, mulching and specification of native plants.

Its great to see some press about how landscape architects can assist owners or developers of commercial buildings.

Read the full article at the [SOURCE: stltoday.com - Tips for seeking LEED certification -How can landscape planning help achieve LEED certification?]

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