Preserving biodiversity in suburban, rural areas [Event: Workshop]

Development in urban, suburban and even rural areas can often limit the variety of plant and animal life in these environments. In some cases, development also means an increase in exotic plants, which can ultimately displace native plant communities, which in turn can disrupt local populations of birds, bugs and other native wildlife.

Developers, planners, landscape architects, policymakers, landowners and others involved with the management of growth and development can learn about techniques for conserving and restoring biodiversity at upcoming workshops sponsored by University of Missouri Extension and the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

The University of Missouri Extension is holding a workshop at two locations in Missouri: April 26 at the St. Charles County Extension Center, 260 Brown Road, St. Peters; and April 27 at the Boone County Extension Center, 1012 N. Highway UU, Columbia. Workshops run 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at both sites. Cost is $35.

For information and registration details, contact either Scott Killpack at the St. Charles County Extension Center at 636-970-3000, killpacks@missouri.edu; or Kent Shannon at the Boone County Extension Center at 573-445-9792, shannond@missouri.edu.

Transit driven urban development

Streetsblog asks the question Can Transit Expansion Produce Sprawl Like Highways Do? looks at the proposed Silver line in Washington DC and speaks to some experts about the possible sprawl, development of semi-urban enclaves around transit and the difference with park-n-ride.

Read more at Can Transit Expansion Produce Sprawl Like Highways Do? – Streetsblog

Study of plants shows urban flora changes

UPI.com reports

U.S. scientists say a study of 70-year-old dried plant specimens from Indianapolis reveals the impact of increasing urbanization on plant diversity. Butler University researchers examined 2,800 dried plants collected around the city before 1940 and compared them with plants found at 16 field sites between 1996 and 2006, an article in the Journal of Ecology.

Read more: UPI Study of plants shows urban flora changes

Using sheep for traffic calming in Switzerland

Traffic calming is often boring and uninspiring use of speed humps, table tops, islands, circles, rumble strips. Recently Christophe Machet was commissioned by the Municipality of Gland in Switzerland and created a flock of reflective sheep getting lost in the city. By invading the streets, they force the drivers to slow down.

Spotted at Inhabitat

Melbourne: is that all there is? – an Airport as the gateway to the city

Bruce Guthrie wrote an article recently in The Age newspaper about the poor landscape that greets new arrivals to the city.

A FOREST of billboards greets visitors as they leave Melbourne Airport for the drive along Tullamarine Freeway to the city…

Surely we can do better. I’m not even asking for public art; in fact, I would settle for some decent landscaping on the freeway median strip and verges…..

Hong Kong it isn’t. That’s a showpiece, with dramatic vistas almost every metre of the drive to and from the airport. And it’s not Singapore either, manicured to within an inch of its life. But it could be Los Angeles’s LAX, an ugly duckling airport that with some thoughtful landscape architecture is now a popular postcard.

Read the full article at The Age – So, welcome to Melbourne: is that all there is?

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