This Week in Landscape | 22 January 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

The design at the centre of Tim Waterman discussion: 'Snail and Snake Mound' Garden of Cosmic Speculation (Image Credit: Flickr user yellowbook)

Bad role models for landscape architecture | Tim Waterman | Landscape Institute
In the first of a six part series exploring how bad design concepts can get projects off to a false start, Tim Waterman explores the shortcomings of the ‘Inflexible Abstraction’.

Nature as Infrastructure | Ethel Baraona Pohl | Domus
An architecture report from Haerbin City by Ethel Baraona Pohl about how Turenscape’s founder Kongjian Yu demonstrates how nature can be a cost-free service provider in an urban context. Ecology is a synonym of economy.

Olmsted’s jewels in our midst | Justin Martin | Star Tribune
Few people can claim to know America as deeply as Frederick Law Olmsted did. His intimate knowledge of the American landscape served him superbly in the role for which he is best remembered — the country’s pioneering park maker.

San Francisco’s plan to cut non-native trees sparks environmental clash | Susan Sward | The Sacramento Bee
An intense battle is building over a little-known plan to cut down thousands of eucalyptus and other trees in urban forests here and at a city-owned golf course in Pacifica.

Critics fear loss of green spaces in regional development plan | Monique Beaudin | Montreal Gazette
West Island residents who worry that a new regional development plan will force them to allow construction on green spaces

Image Credit: Flickr user yellowbook

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THE LENS by Michael Maltzan Architecture wins St.Petersburg Pier Design Competition

St.Petersburg Pier Design Competition Finalists©Michael Maltzan Architecture
The Judging Panel has selected “The Lens” design by Michael Maltzan Architecture with Tom Leader Studio. The City Council will hold a workshop to decide if they accept the panel’s decision and to engage the winner in the next stage of developing the design.

The jury evaluating the proposals is comprised of: Stanley Saitowitz, a South African architect and an architecture professor from University of California, Berkeley; James Moore, PhD, a Tampa-based urban designer and former architecture and design professor at USF; Susan Fainstein, PhD, a Harvard University urban design professor; City Council Member Leslie Curran and Pinellas County Commissioner Ken Welch.

The new Pier is not an icon unto itself. It is instead a lens that frames the City’s relationship to the water, changing how St. Petersburg views its present and its future. While the Pier will remain an important attraction for visitors, we believe that the Pier must be first for the people of St. Petersburg, an active, vital part of the City’s life and culture. Operating on multiple scales of renewal—individual, urban, economic, ecological—this new Pier serve as a new kind of fountain of youth for St. Petersburg and its citizens, a symbol of the renewed vitality of the City, a platform for continued growth, and a destination within the City, the region, and our nation.  – Michael Maltzan Architecture (Competition Entry Design Statement)

HASSELL wins double honours in CERN public realm competition

HASSELL-CERN
HASSELL was recognised yesterday for its entry in both categories of the international Public Realm competition for CERN in Geneva. The competition invited designs for a new public area and reception for CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, which houses the Large Hadron Collider.

Continue reading HASSELL wins double honours in CERN public realm competition

Railway Project Landscape | Clifton Hill Australia | Jeavons Landscape Architects

Railway Project Landscape | Clifton Hill Australia | Jeavons Landscape Architects

IMAGE CREDIT | Andrew Lloyd

The Clifton Hill Rail Project began as a key transport initiative to duplicate the railway track between Clifton Hill and Westgarth Stations. The result of which was an opportunity to deliver a landscape that stitched together the Merri Creek environs, a new rail bridge, pedestrian and cyclist needs and the local community. The result is a beautifully executed landscape which demonstrates the integral role that a landscape architect has in delivering a multi-dimensional project varying in scale, programs, stakeholders, and contexts.

Railway Project Landscape | Clifton Hill Australia | Jeavons Landscape Architects

IMAGE CREDIT | Andrew Lloyd

Continue reading Railway Project Landscape | Clifton Hill Australia | Jeavons Landscape Architects

Miami Science Museum | Miami USA | Arquitectonica GEO

Miami Science Museum | Miami USA | Arquitectonica GEO

View from Biscayne Boulevard - Planting at grade has a native focus in which environment suggests planting strategy.

Landscape design for a 5 level, state of the art Science Museum in the heart of Downtown Miami. The site is comprised of 4 acres and will share an elevated plaza with the new Miami Art Museum.
The Miami Science Museum will be an institute of technology, education and the environment, and the landscape design will serve as an extension of this. Outfitted with a 17,000 sf garden roof, ½ acre rain garden, and civic scaled plaza; the landscape design plays a major role in the Museum experience. In addition to illustrating regional landscape types, this “functioning landscape” reduces water use, improves water quality, enhances biodiversity, provides educational opportunities, and even produces food.
Continue reading Miami Science Museum | Miami USA | Arquitectonica GEO

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