Sheffield Parkway bridge design winner

Danish architect Tim Norlund has beaten over 100 entries to gain first prize in the Sheffield Parkway footbridge competition.

Norlund joined forces with Ramboll Whitby Bird after his design was short-listed to the second stage in the competition. They will work together with the client team at Sheffield and Rotherham Councils, to take the scheme forward.

Read more @ Builder & Engineer – Sheffield Parkway bridge design winner.

Architecture: It’s not for sissies

The buildings that Canadian architects talk about are inevitably the ones that come to shape Canadian cities. Many of them are on the public’s radar, as well: Daniel Libeskind’s Royal Ontario Museum Crystal addition, for example, or Frank Gehry’s Transformation project for the Art Gallery of Ontario.

But within the design business, it’s often the lesser-known buildings, many of them not in Canada, that have the most impact. What follows are a few buildings that savvy architects say are the most influential right now, either as inspiration or as cautionary tale.

A building’s influence today depends on three areas of interest, says Larry Richards, the former dean of the Faculty of Architecture at the University of Toronto: “new materials, sculptural experimentation and sustainability.” For new materials, he notes the extruded pink plastic on the exterior of the new Umbra store in Toronto by Kohn Shnier Architects. And the silvery aluminum mesh on the exterior of Manhattan’s New Museum of Contemporary Art by Tokyo-based Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizwa (jointly known as SANAA), which gives the structure a hard edge at a distance and an up-close softness.

Read more @ Architecture: It’s not for sissies. – National Post – Kelvin Browne

Inhabitat » Amazing Green Roof Art School in Singapore

If art school was in our future we might opt to study under, or on top of, the amazing green roof at the School of Art, Design and Media at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. This 5 story facility sweeps a wooded corner of the campus with an organic, vegetated form that blends landscape and structure, nature and high-tech and symbolizes the creativity it houses.

Read and See more @ Inhabitat » Amazing Green Roof Art School in Singapore.

Trend: Creativity Made in China – MAD Architects

Over the last two decades China has become known as the factory of the world; “Made in China” has often come to symbolize cheapness, sub-standard quality and lack of originality. More recently however, thanks to a booming economy, political deregulation and social development, China has witnessed the gradual evolution of a free-thinking generation of creative individuals who have broken free from the system to express themselves in profound and innovative ways.

As part of this movement, growing numbers of Chinese architects, emboldened by the general fervor currently gripping China’s artistic community, are designing buildings which are slowly but surely imprinting a new identity on the Chinese built landscape.

At the forefront of this architectural revolution have been Ma Yansong, a young US-educated Chinese architect, and his Beijing-based architectural agency MAD, founded in 2002. MAD took the international architectural scene by storm in 2006, as the first Chinese studio ever to win an design competition outside China. The “Absolute Tower” in Toronto, Canada, is scheduled for completion in 2009.

Read more @ Trend: Creativity Made in China – MAD Architects | CScout TrendBlog.

In architecture, as elsewhere, sex sells

In the early days of modern architecture, its alien forms were sold to the public using science. Architect Richard Neutra’s “Health House” – designed and built between 1927-29 for physician Philip Lovell in the Griffith Park neighbourhood of Los Angeles – was featured in newspapers and magazines all over the world.

Mr. Neutra’s four-storey, steel-framed and stucco-clad house was graceful in the way it clung to its hillside site. But far outweighing any discussion of architectural merit were reports of its fresh-air sleeping porches, large areas of glass (to allow life-giving sunlight to penetrate), exercise and sports areas and the water-purification and juicing facilities in the kitchen.

Even before that, in 1923, architect Le Corbusier wrote: “A house is a machine for living in.”

Read more @ globeandmail.com: In architecture, as elsewhere, sex sells.

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